Sunday, March 23, 2008

King Michael Bloomberg's Attempt at Abolishing the Eighth Amendment

Bill of Rights - Amendment VIII

Excessive fines; cruel and unusual punishment.

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
nor cruel and unusual punisjment be inflicted.

Monday, June 11, 2007

Sunday, June 10, 2007

This Blog is in response to "King Michael Bloomberg's"- pompous, ill-advised and tyrannical attempt to impose his "Reign of Greed" over the Free and Independent People of the City and State of New York ! With his outrageous proposal of imposing his so called $8.00 Congestion Tax.

Saturday, June 9, 2007

The Intolerable Acts of King Michael Bloomberg the I, of 2007.

In his latest attempt to subjugate the free and independent people of New York. He is brazenly attempting to impose an outrageous and
unjustified $8.00 city entry tax, which will cause undue and immense harm and financial hardship. Adversely affecting primarily the hard working middle and lower class citizens and small businesses, the backbone of the city's economy. Who are as it is struggling to keep bread on their table and a roof over their family's heads. thereby affecting the city economy as a whole.

The silent majority who are going to be affected and are opposed to this atrocity, shall not sit idly by. We will voice our outrage in order to prevent this from ever becoming a reality.

Just as "We The People" succeeded in having King Mike the I, backtrack and waive the parking tickets issued to us, his lowly subjects during the snow storm back in February 2007.(See full story below) And just as "We The People" defeated the Illegal immigration bill in Congress, so shall we be victorious in our just cause. Let's unite, rise up and take action. It's time we let our voices be heard and make a difference. Your participation and input is encouraged and welcome!!


New York Post

June 9, 2007 -- Mayor Bloomberg made his hardest sell of his congestion-pricing plan yesterday as he faced a testy grilling from skeptical state lawmakers who called the fee an unfair tax.

Bloomberg pitched the plan as a must-do for New York, saying the state Legislature should approve it in the next few weeks so the city can qualify for $500 million in federal aid to cover $225 million in start-up costs and pay for mass-transit improvements.

"Now is the time to do this," Boomberg said, adding that neighborhoods would benefit from improved mass transit, and the fee would help ease pollution, reduce asthma rates, and even reduce global warming.

"The threats to our city, and our planet, are inconvenient truths that we can no longer avoid facing, and that we can no longer wait for Washington to confront," Bloomberg added, referring to the title of Al Gore's Oscar-winning documentary, "An Inconvenient Truth."

At a hearing with state lawmakers in Manhattan, he and Deputy Mayor Dan Doctoroff said it would take roughly 1,000 cameras at about 340 different locations to administer the system by photographing the license plates of cars entering Manhattan south of 86th Street so bills can be sent to drivers.

Assemblymen Herman "Denny" Farrell (D-Manhattan) and Richard Brodsky (D-Westchester) greeted the idea skeptically, often cutting off Bloomberg and Doctoroff as they talked.

"Is this not a flat tax?" Farrell asked, adding that while he agrees congestion is a problem, he has concerns that "the cure turns out not to be as good as it should be and we get into a worse situation."

Farrell also cited the "campaign" in the media by supporters of the plan to push the Legislature into action, saying, "This is not a time for haste but for thoughtful consideration."

Calling congestion pricing "regressive," Brodsky said, "If there is a proposal that's fairer and that's practical, we should adopt it."

Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan (D-Queens) said the plan would do little to keep people from "toll shopping" to drive on the free bridges, noting that the Queens Midtown Tunnel backup, where there's a $4.50 toll, is already massive.

And the man who has one of the biggest roles in the process - Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver - wasn't at the hearing, and kept his cards close to the vest on whether he can be sold on it.

Silver said he hadn't spoken to the mayor, but said it's a "major issue."

Bloomberg Forced to Appologize, Waives Parking Tickets - February 16, 2007

Mayor Michael Bloomberg after being put against the wall, apologized on Friday to drivers all over the city who were outraged that parking rules were upheld during this week's winter storm, resulting in thousands (Over 4,000) of tickets on stuck cars.

"I'm sorry for the inconvenience to people," he said, Bloomberg added that the tickets would be thrown out.

Friday's newspapers took up the cause: with a front page headline of "Give Us A Break," the Daily News called for citywide ticket dismissal. And the New York Sun reminded Bloomberg about the unfortunate tale that followed Lindsay for years.

If Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is really so sorry to inconvenience the people of New York, how can he justify his preposterous proposal of imposing the $8.00 Entry Tax into NYC.